BP3 vs 52nd ID Official Scrimmage Write up and Awards

116th
The Seal


29TH INFANTRY DIVISION
116TH REGIMENT, 1ST BN
BAKER COMPANY


Official Awards for Meritorious Service Before and During BP3's Deployment
March 20th, 2016




Second Lieutenant Jeffrey T. Perdiew
For our defense round, 2Lt. Perdiew led the defense and situated himself as an Artillery Officer at the top of the Bridge Defense cap point with our only Radio Operator. This position gave him a clear view of the Wooden Bridge and all surrounding areas. Sgt. Kim was located in the bunker as our additional Artillery Officer to scout out the Land Bridge area and with this position he reported multiple contacts forming around the land bridge. 2Lt. Perdiew managed to find a vantage point near the Bridge Defense to get an artillery position around the Land Bridge. Using this position, 2Lt. Perdiew called in multiple artillery strikes on the enemy as they were preparing their assault. When the defense round had ended, the Lieutenant had amassed 11 whole kills from his accurate and timely artillery strikes. The actions of 2Lt. Perdiew had an immense contribution to our defense round and did not allow the enemy to even properly assault across the river. For his actions, I am recommending 2Lt. Perdiew for the Army Commendation Medal. Additionally for participating in his third official scrimmage, 2Lt. Perdiew is being awarded his 2nd Combat Infantry Badge. Lastly for leading BP3 to victory in an official Scrimmage I am happy to award him the Legion of Merit.


Combat Infantry Badge, 2nd AwardWWII Victory MedalLegion of MeritArmy Commendation Medal

Staff Sergeant Tyler T. Brewer
For participating in his third official scrimmage, SSgt. Brewer is being awarded his 2nd Combat Infantry Badge. Secondly for being second in command and assisting and supporting 2Lt. Perdiew in leading BP3 in an official Scrimmage I am happy to award him the Army Commendation Medal. In addition to this for taking part in a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory he is also receiving a WWII Victory Medal.

Combat Infantry Badge, 2nd AwardWWII Victory MedalArmy Commendation Medal


Sergeant Aleksander D. Antosiewicz
Sgt. Antosiewicz has been a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory is therefore receiving a WWII Victory Medal.


WWII Victory Medal

Sergeant Samuel Kim
As BP3 began their preparations for the scrimmage, Sgt. Kim was handed the daunting task of forming an attack plan. The attack round was going to be the most difficult round being that there were only two chokepoints to move through and the enemy had artillery at their disposal. Sgt. Kim's plan was for us to weaken their forces with artillery and recon as much as we could with SSgt. Brewer as artillery officer. The Sergeant put together a potentially risky plan to have three trucks cross the wooden bridge as artillery landed on the bridge defense and for the attack force to cut west to get into the forest west of bridge defense. Despite the nerves of leading such an assault, Sgt. Kim remained steadfast and kept the men of BP3 calm and led BP3 to systematically clear out every objective with receiving minimal casualties. Sgt. Kim's planning and leadership on the battlefield was integral for our victory, and for this I am awarding him the Soldier's Medal.

WWII Victory MedalSoldier's Medal


Sergeant Paul W. Rousse
Sgt. Rousse has been a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory is therefore receiving a WWII Victory Medal.


WWII Victory Medal

Corporal Nathanial T. Poklemba
Cpl. Poklemba has been a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory is therefore receiving a WWII Victory Medal.


WWII Victory Medal

Corporal Jordan W. Zenhenko
For the defense round, BP3 was split up into two teams focused around both the Bunker and Bridge Defense caps. Cpl. Zenhenko was placed near the Bunker cap with the bunker ambush fireteam. SSgt. Brewer assigned Cpl. Zenhenko to a very important but dangerous position placed close to the river bed behind a ridge. His job was to watch the riverbed east of the Wooden Bridge and to set up an ambush on the Land Bridge when the enemy crossed. After the artillery barrages, multiple enemy contacts were still able to cross the Land Bridge and become a nuisance to BP3's defense of the Bunker. Cpl. Zenhenko quickly picked off two of them after they crossed. Two remaining riflemen began to inflict casualties on the Bunker Defense team taking out Cpl. Rousse and PFC Barr. He then proceeded to hunt down the remaining two riflemen on our side of the river to finish off the round with a total of four kills. His last kill potentially saved PFC Speirs's life as well. While the artillery barrages inflicted great casualties on the defense round, Cpl. Zenhenko ensured victory for BP3 with his accurate rifle skills and outmaneuvering of the enemy. For this, I am recommending him for a Bronze Star. Additionally, for participating in his third official scrimmage he is being awarded the 2nd Combat Infantry Badge. Finally, for being a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory he shall also receive a WWII Victory Medal.


Combat Infantry Badge, 2nd AwardWWII Victory MedalBronze Star

Technician, 5th Grade Mark A. Minor
T/5 Minor has now participated in his third official scrimmage and is therefore receiving his 2nd Combat Infantry Badge.


Combat Infantry Badge Mark 2WWII Victory Medal

Technician, 5th Grade Christopher S. Noye
T/5 Noye has participated in his first official scrimmage and is therefore eligible to receive his first Combat Infantry Badge. In addition, for being a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory he shall also receive a WWII victory medal.


Combat Infantry Badge, 1st AwardWWII Victory Medal

Private, First Class Devon E. Atkinson
PFC Atkinson has been a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory is therefore receiving a WWII Victory Medal.


WWII Victory Medal

Private, First Class Mike A. Barr
PFC Barr has been a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory is therefore receiving a WWII Victory Medal.


WWII Victory Medal

Private, First Class Thomas G. Gray
PFC Gray has participated in his first official scrimmage and is therefore eligible to receive his first Combat Infantry Badge. In addition, for being a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory he shall also receive a WWII Victory Medal.


Combat Infantry Badge Mark 1WWII Victory Medal

Private, First Class Evan V. McLean
PFC McLean has been a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory is therefore receiving a WWII Victory Medal.


WWII Victory Medal

Private, First Class Samuel V. Morse
PFC Morse has been a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory is therefore receiving a WWII Victory Medal.


WWII Victory Medal

Private, First Class Justin D. Neve
PFC Neve has participated in his first official scrimmage and is therefore eligible to receive his first Combat Infantry Badge. In addition, for being a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory he shall also receive a WWII Victory Medal.


Combat Infantry Badge Mark 1WWII Victory Medal

Private, First Class Caesar A. Redd
PFC Redd has been a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory is therefore receiving a WWII Victory Medal.


WWII Victory Medal

Private, First Class Tristen A. Speirs
After the announcement of our scrimmage against the 52nd ID, PFC Speirs immediately took it upon himself to assist BP3 in preparations for our upcoming battle. PFC Speirs created many materials for the members of BP3 to study which allowed them to better learn the map. His efforts included a walk-through video of our area of operations and a map with distinctive names for key areas of each caps, such as bunkers of the Bridge Defense. Along with his out of game work, PFC Speirs also helped organize multiple drills for the platoon to train. His actions greatly assisted BP3 is their preparations for this scrimmage, and for this, I am nominating PFC Speirs for a Soldier's Medal. Additionally, for participating in his first official scrimmage he is eligible to receive his first Combat Infantry Badge. In addition, for being a part of a two round scrimmage in which both rounds were a victory he shall also receive a WWII Victory Medal.


Combat Infantry Badge, 1st AwardWWII Victory MedalSoldier's Medal

Cpt. Patty
Commanding Officer
Baker Company HQ
Cpt. Patty

Comments

  • edited April 2016

    116th
    The Seal


    29TH INFANTRY DIVISION
    116TH REGIMENT, 1ST BN
    BAKER COMPANY



    2Lt. Perdiew and Sgt. Kim's After Action Report:
    BP3's deployment against the 52nd Infantry Division.

    March 5th, 2016





    On Saturday, the Fifth of March, 2016 the brave men of Baker Company, Third Platoon (BP3) deployed against the 52nd Infantry Division (52nd ID). There were two rounds of attack/defense on a modified version of the map titled Bridgehead. During both rounds, BP3 would participate as Axis and the 52nd ID would be Allies.

    The conditions of victory were the following for BP3 in each round.

    • When defending, BP3 could achieve victory by eliminating the other team or preventing the attacking team from simultaneously capturing and holding all 5 objectives at the end of the hour time limit.
    • When attacking, BP3 could achieve victory by eliminating the other team or simultaneously capturing and holding all 5 objectives at the end of the hour time limit.
    • In the event of a draw, the winner would be determined by who held more objectives at the end of their respective attacking round.

    For the attackers, their starting position could be anywhere South of the river on the western section of the map. For the defenders, their starting position was anywhere North of the river on the western section of the map.

    For both rounds, based on prior arrangements that both units agreed upon, the teams were composed of the following:

    The defending and attacking team, team had 2 artillery officers, 1 radio man, and 14 riflemen. The only difference between the two was that the attacking team would get access to three trucks that could carry 8 individuals at once. Both teams had unlimited use of artillery that could be called in every couple minutes as long as that team had a living radio man and artillery officer.


    The following account of the defense is written by 2Lt. Perdiew:

    BP3 began the deployment starting out on the defense. Our team was sectioned into four separate squads. They were as follows...

    • The Bridge Defense Bunker Squad: This squad consisted of only 2Lt. Perdiew as the artillery officer, Sgt. Antosiewicz as the radio man, and PFC Redd as a rifleman. All three individuals were spread out across the bunkers in the Bridge Defense Capture Zone. With PFC Redd on his own and 2Lt. Perdiew and Sgt. Antosiewicz sharing one in order to utilize artillery. These three individuals would use the bunkers as indestructible observation posts to watch the wood bridge and the area adjacent to it on the defender's side of the river. This would provide vital battlefield intelligence in order to communicate information squads. Not only that but also it provided an excellent, well defended position to survey the battlefield for potential artillery targets.

    • The Bridge Defense Ambush Squad: This squad consisted of T/5 Noye (Squad Leader), PFC Atkinson, PFC Neve, PFC McLean, Cpl. Poklemba, PFC Morse; all members of this squad were riflemen. They sat in the forest directly to the west of the Bridge Defenses Capture Zone. They would hide there under orders to under no circumstances reveal themselves until ordered. This position provided an excellent tactical advantage as it would allow BP3 to mount an excellent offensive against the attackers in the event that they crossed the wood bridge and made their way towards the cover of the western forest. It also provided the opportunity to fall back and reinforce new defensive positions should the attackers ever gain a foothold on our side of the river. The secrecy of this squad's position was vital to its success to prevent becoming an easy target for artillery.

    • The Bunker Squad: This squad only consisted of two men, Sgt. Kim as the second Artillery Officer, PFC Spiers as a rifleman. Like the Bridge Defenses squad this squad would sit in the lone concrete bunker and use it as an indestructible observation post by which to survey the eastern crossing of the river, or the land bridge. They would be safe from artillery and also be able to provide vital battlefield intelligence to their nearby Ambush Squad.

    • The Bunker Ambush Squad: This squad consisted of SSgt. Brewer (squad leader), Cpl. Rousse, Cpl. Zenhenko, T/5 Minor, PFC Gray, PFC Barr; all members of this squad were riflemen. These men would be spread out in the forest and hills directly North of the land bridge. In the event that they were to attempt a crossing, the Bunker Ambush Squad could easily run out of the forest and crest the hills, and then fire down upon a completely exposed enemy. The secrecy of this squad's position was vital to its success to prevent becoming an easy target for artillery.

    Upon going LIVE, our scouts from the Bunker Ambush squad reported enemy activity in the immediate vicinity to the south. To prevent an immediate rush of the wood bridge, 2Lt. Perdiew called artillery strikes down on the wood bridge, which yielded no kills. While the artillery dropped, reconnaissance reported that the infantry were massing at woods south of the river near the land bridge. SSgt. Brewer used his available men to act as observers from cover to continually relay vital intelligence to the rest of the team. Cpl. Zenhenko himself laid prone behind a small rock overlooking the river, maintaining a close proximity to the land bridge. After about three minutes into the scrim, the 52nd ID moved into the wood bridge capture zone and captured it. 2Lt. Perdiew in response called down more artillery on the wood bridge, only to yield no kills once again. The 52nd ID countered with their own artillery strikes which were directed at the bunker. This yielded no kills as Sgt. Kim and PFC Spiers remained safely inside their concrete defensive position.

    For another couple minutes, both teams traded sporadic fire from their respective sides of the river. At a little after the six minute mark, Cpl. Zenhenko spotted infantry moving near the land bridge. 2Lt. Perdiew, heeding the intelligence from the scouts near the bunker, issued an artillery strike directly south of the land bridge on the enemy's side of the river. While waiting for it to drop, Cpl. Zenhenko took the opportunity reveal himself from cover and take shots at the enemy. With his K98 rifle he scored a vital shot at long range through shrubbery, eliminating the enemy commander, Captain Stevens, and also scoring the first kill of the deployment.

    A mere couple seconds after this kill, 7 minutes into the deployment, 2Lt. Perdiew's artillery found its mark and eliminated 5 more enemy infantry from the battlefield. This appeared to throw the enemy into a frenzy, causing them to flee from the artillery zone and charge across the land bridge to engage BP3. Within seconds the bunker ambush squad emerged from their concealment in unison and took positions immediately on a hill overlooking the land bridge where they were able to easily sight in on a very exposed group of infantry. Cpl. Zenhenko, still very close to the land bridge began shooting rapidly, scoring another kill for the 29th. Before falling back he engaged targets in his immediate proximity as well as those directly across the river and scored another kill.

    To ensure that the southern half of land bridge was was clear, 2Lt. Perdiew called another artillery strike into the area. Communications at this point were haphazard as the enemy was in disarray and the bunker ambush squad had revealed themselves and were starting to consider the pitfalls of staying in one position and becoming victims of artillery themselves. The 52nd ID began returning fire and Cpl. Rousse was our first casualty.

    To prevent giving the enemy an easy artillery target, SSgt. Brewer called for the bunker ambush squad to fall back. They rallied around the bunker in order to support it in the face of what would likely be an inevitable attack by the enemy. At a little after the 10 minute mark, an enemy truck was spotted crossing the land bridge, taking a hard right turn after landing on the northern side of the river to make a break for the bunker position. SSgt. Brewer called for men to prepare grenades in order to throw them down the hill at the truck that headed towards bunker. In order to shock the bunker, the 52nd ID coordinated an artillery strike in tandem with their assault. So aggressive was the artillery strike in coordination with the 52nd ID's assault that their artillery killed one of their own men.

    At this point it was believed that a great number of enemy infantry were consolidated in the forest near the bunker. 2Lt. Perdiew countered this threat by immediately calling an artillery strike placed squarely on the entrance to the forest to the right of the wood bridge. This artillery strike proved fruitless and Sgt. Kim at the bunker squad continued to report no enemy contacts despite a truck very clearly entering the forest near bunker.

    At the 13 minute mark, Cpl. Zenhenko spotted a truck south of the river heading towards the wood bridge. This was then spotted by the forces at the bridge defenses who immediately opened fire on it as it crossed. The driver then stopped the truck in full view of the bridge defenses after taking aggressive fire and bolted into the cover of the forest. Although BP3 continued to put fire on the truck, no enemy infantry were reporting as casualties, leading us to believe that this was a decoy.

    2Lt. Perdiew, finding it highly suspect that no infantry had since been reported crossing the land bridge, yet continually finding activity at the wood bridge with the crossing of two trucks, ordered another artillery strike on BP3's side of the river on it's northern shore adjacent to the wood bridge. This artillery strike would prove invaluable as it destroyed two of the enemy trucks and killed 6 infantry instantly, including the last living artillery officer. This had effectively nixed the 52nd ID's ability to call in future artillery strikes. At this point, 16 of the 17 enemy infantry were dead; with one enemy infantry dying of an accidental suicide. This was opposed to only 1 death on on our side.

    SSgt. Brewer then reported enemy activity to the south of their position near land bridge. The remaining enemy forces began firing upon our troops, with PFC Barr going down to rifle fire. At close to 17 minutes, 2Lt. Perdiew ordered a counter attack on the remaining infantry as the 29th possessed vastly superior numbers at this point. Cpl. Zenhenko, who spotted an enemy soldier who had successfully crossed the bridge and made it into our flanks, began searching for him. Walking to the position where he last saw him and then tracing his most likely point of attack up in the hills to the north. He quickly spotted the remaining enemy trooper and threw grenades at him, neutralizing him and scoring the final kill to win the defensive round for BP3. The final casualty list was the complete destruction of the 52nd ID with only two casualties on BP3: Cpl. Rousse and PFC Barr.


    The following account of the attack is written by Sgt. Kim:

    On March 5, 2016, Baker Company Third Platoon was tasked with capturing enemy positions on Bridgehead defended by the 52nd Infantry Division: Bridge, Bunker, Bridge Defenses, Barn, and Fortified Hill.

    52th Infantry Division’s defense was comprised of 2 artillery officers, 1 radio operator, and 12 riflemen.

    BP3 had two artillery officers, one radio operator, 14 riflemen, and 3 Opel Blitz trucks at disposal.

    Men of BP3 were divided into three fire teams.

    • Fire team A led by T/5 Noye was tasked point and assault duties
    • Fire team B led by Cpl. Poklemba was our main support element
    • Fire team C was led by Cpl. Zenhenko, and was the main bulk of the assault element.

    SSgt. Brewer and 2Lt. Perdiew were the artillery officers. PFC Redd was the radio operator.

    When the battle began, SSgt. Brewer and PFC Redd were in Roadhouse, scanning possible enemy positions adjacent to the river, as well as the bunker. The rest of the platoon was on standby, spread out in the woods South of Roadhouse. As we expected, SSgt. Brewer spotted a few enemy forward observers East and West of the Bridge. SSgt. Brewer called in an artillery strike on the trenches East of the Bridge and took out two enemies right off the bat. BP3 Patiently waited as SSgt. Brewer continued to scan possible enemy positions. He confirmed at least one target at the Bunker, and another behind broken walls West of the bridge. SSgt. Brewer called in another artillery strike West of the bridge and scared off the enemy observer. At this point, the 52nd was down to 13 men, and it was presumed that their artillery officer and radio operator were at the bunker, because enemy artillery strikes were falling down on land bridge periodically. Sgt. Kim, who was in charge of leading the assault, made a calculated decision to commence the attack. BP3 was ordered to mount up and drive across the bridge. SSgt. Brewer and PFC Redd called in one final artillery strike on Bridge Defenses from a forward position, and simultaneously, BP3 approached the bridge as shells mercilessly pounded the enemy position at Bridge Defenses.

    As expected, BP3 came under accurate rifle fire as their trucks crossed the narrow bridge. A few men were wounded, and 2Lt. Perdiew and PFC Atkinson were killed by enemy small arms fire. However, men of BP3 understood that they needed to push through the choke point and establish a base of fire in order to execute a successful assault. BP3’s three trucks took a hard left immediately upon crossing the bridge, and fire team B dismounted behind broken walls 10 meters Northwest of the bridge. They got on-line behind the walls and called out multiple contacts to the Northeast all while taking fire. Fire team B fiercely fought back and held their ground in order to allow fire teams A and C to maneuver. A and C continued West and dismounted at the bottom of West hill, and immediately started climbing the hill to flank Bridge Defenses. Men of A and C understood that speed and aggression were the only things that could help alleviate pressure from fire team B.

    Seconds prior to the assault, SSgt. Brewer, who was attached to fire team B, called in an artillery strike on the East side of Bridge Defenses in order to assist A and C. This artillery barrage in fact claimed another enemy's life. As soon as the shells started impacting, C began assaulting fearlessly and A provided cover fire for the first few seconds to achieve fire superiority before joining C on the assault. A and C fearlessly cleared out bunkers and trenches, and the 52nd fought back hard. BP3 scored 4 kills during this assault, but also lost 4 men. Half way through the assault, fire team A broke off and secured the forest North of Bridge Defenses, and fire team B pushed up and regrouped with the rest of the team.

    After clearing and securing Bridge Defenses, B and C joined A in the woods to the North to prepare for yet another assault. This time, the objective was Fortified Hill. As they were preparing for the assault, BP3 took sporadic rifle fire from bunkers up ahead. SSgt. Brewer called in an artillery strike to scare off the rifleman, and after the last barrage, BP3 charged without hesitation and cleared Fortified Hill, eliminating 1 enemy. Then, BP3 set up a 360 security at Fortified Hill in case of enemy counter attack. Though the counter attack never came, men of BP3 spotted two enemies east of the Barn. BP3 opened fire but missed as the enemy egressed East.

    BP3 pushed downhill toward Fortified Hill with two riflemen at Fortified Hill on over-watch duty. As BP3 captured Barn, one of the enemy riflemen that fell back earlier began firing from the East. BP3 returned fire, but enemy fire was starting to come uncomfortably close. At this point, the 52nd was down to two men, and BP3 was still 9 men strong. Sgt. Kim ordered BP3 to move toward the bunker and expose themselves out in the open to draw fire and locate the enemy. As expected, BP3 came under rifle fire. However, PFC Gray was able to pinpoint the enemy position and relay this intel to the rest of the team. T/5 Noye valorously charged in open field and pursued the enemy to draw the enemy out, and PFC Gray made the shot and took out the enemy rifleman. Meanwhile, the rest of BP3 pushed South toward the Bunker objective. As they approached, BP3 heard the Lee Enfield rifle of the last remaining enemy go off. PFC Barr was killed by the first shot he fired. Seconds after PFC Barr’s death, BP3 skillfully maneuvered around the bunker to overwhelm the last standing enemy. SSgt. Brewer scored the final kill, closing BP3’s hard fought assault at Bridgehead.


    The first round lasted approximately 18 minutes. The Second round lasted approximately 31 minutes.

    On behalf of BP3, I, 2Lt. Perdiew, would like to thank the wonderful men of the 52nd Infantry Division unit for agreeing to meet us on this battlefield in the spirit of competition.

    I would also like to thank all the non-BP3 members of Baker company for helping us prepare for this scrimmage. Your assistance made us realize the importance of developing an extremely aggressive attack strategy in order to avoid the perils of artillery on this map.

    Additionally, thank you to all Squad Leaders, Assistant Squad Leaders, and SSgt. Brewer of BP3. Without your hardcore dedication to rigorously training men on this map, I do not believe things would have gone as smoothly as they did. Special thanks to Cpl. Zenhenko and PFC Spiers, who took the time to provide edited photographs that depicted robust information about specific points on the map.

    Finally, thank you to the Executive Leadership of the 29th for fostering an environment that can provide these beloved experiences for me and my men.


    2Lt. Perdiew

    2nd Lieutenant Perdiew
    Platoon Leader
    BP3

  • Congratulations BP3, well deserved!

  • Good job, BP3

  • Well done, lads!

  • Congratulations BP3!

  • Congratulations BP3 !

  • Congrats everyone!

  • Congrats all!

  • Well done BP3 upholding 29th standards excellent...

  • Nice work BP3!

  • Congrats one and all. Keep knocking them dead 2Lt.!!!

  • Congratulations BP3! You did it GOOD!

  • Solid work BP3! Congrats to everyone!

  • Quite impressive, BP3. Congratulations!

  • Congrats BP3! This is so awesome

  • Hip Hip Hurray!

    Well done everyone!

    Salute

  • Good show, everyone!

  • For those interested, here are the videos from the scrim:

    Attack Round:

    Defense Round:

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